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May 21st, 2013

Posted In: Looting Matters

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May 21st, 2013

Posted In: Looting Matters

implications for Swiss dealer

http://lootingmatters.blogspot.com/2012/04/st-louis-art-museum-mask-implications.html

April 6, 2012

I have noted earlier this week that the collecting history (“provenance”) for the Egyptian mummy mask acquired by the St Louis Art Museum was seemingly flawed. It cannot have been given to the excavator (who died in 1959). It cannot have been in Brussels in 1952. It cannot have been in the “Kaloterna collection” in 1962. The reason for this is the apparently undisputed statement that the mask was known to be in Egypt in 1966 andrecorded in Cairo.

The collecting history for the mask was allegedly supplied by the vendor, Phoenix Ancient Art. One of the owners of the gallery apparently supportsthe repatriation of antiquities to the country of origin. What was the basis for the mask’s collecting history as supplied by Phoenix Ancient Art? Who created the collecting history?

It now appears that SLAM’s due diligence process prior to the acquisition was flawed. The collecting history, as it was understood at the time of acquisition, no longer appears to be secure.

Will the director of SLAM, who is a member of the AAMD, make the appropriate professional and ethical response by opening up negotiations with the Egyptian authorities?

Looting Matters: St Louis Art Museum Mask: implications for Swiss dealer.

April 6th, 2012

Posted In: looting and illegal art traffickers, Looting Matters

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April 5th, 2012

Posted In: Looting Matters

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April 5th, 2012

Posted In: Looting Matters

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February 22nd, 2012

Posted In: Looting Matters, Museum thefts

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February 12th, 2012

Posted In: Looting Matters

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February 12th, 2012

Posted In: Looting Matters

Ali Aboutaam “urges” others to repatriate antiquities

http://lootingmatters.blogspot.com/2009/06/operation-phoenix-ali-aboutaam-urges.html

April 6, 2012
On May 19 it was reported that an unnamed Geneva dealer had returned 251 antiquities worth some €2 million (see

earlier comments). My press release, “Looting Matters: Why Is Switzerland Featured so Frequently in the Return of Antiquities?“, PR Newswire May 29, 2009 Friday 12:01 PM GMT subsequently noted:

“In May 2009 251 antiquities worth around 2 million Euros (US $2.8 million) were returned to Italy from a Geneva-based gallery.”

One hour later another release appeared, “Phoenix Ancient Art Voluntarily Repatriates 251 Antiquities to Italy Worth $2.7 Million“, PR Newswire May 29, 2009 Friday 1:00 PM GMT.

Phoenix Ancient Art, the world’s leading dealer in rare treasures from ancient Western civilizations, announced today that it has voluntarily repatriated 251 antiquities valued at $2.7 Million (EU 2Million) to the State of Italy.

Why did it take ten days for Phoenix Ancient Art to make this statement? What prompted this latest move?

Ali Aboutaam was quoted in the release:

“We returned these ancient artifacts in the spirit of cooperation and collaboration with the international art world, and to demonstrate Phoenix’s commitment to the preservation and repatriation of national treasures to their host countries … We have, amicably settled the matter with the Italian authorities, and urge others in the art world to follow suit and also the lead of some of the world’s great museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in repatriating antiquities whose provenance may be in doubt.”

The press release suggests that the pieces were removed from archaeological contexts in Etruria and Southern Italy during the 1980s. It stress such looting was “unbeknownst to Phoenix”; in other words the pieces had been acquired in “good faith”.

C. Michael Hedqvist, who is director of the Geneva gallery of Phoenix Ancient Art, is also quoted:

“To ensure the provenance of our items, we spend much of our time verifying an art work’s pedigree. In our due diligence process we ask each seller of artwork for proof of identity, as well as for documents pertaining to how long the piece has been in circulation… The returned items were acquired by Phoenix a long time ago, without knowing of their doubtful provenance. Even though a court in Geneva in 2007 rejected the Italian claim and awarded title of the antiquities to Phoenix, proving that we were not at fault, we chose to return the disputed items to the Italian State.”

Ali and Hicham Aboutaam have yet to explain their link with an antiquity returned from Princeton to Italy.

Aboutaam’s urge that other institutions should “follow suit” and repatriate “antiquities whose provenance may be in doubt” will cause discomfort for two particular institutions:

Will these two museums be returning these two acquisitions in the near future?

Looting Matters: Operation Phoenix: Ali Aboutaam .

June 2nd, 2009

Posted In: Looting Matters, Saint Louis Art Museum

Ali Aboutaam “urges” others to repatriate antiquities

http://lootingmatters.blogspot.com/2009/06/operation-phoenix-ali-aboutaam-urges.html

April 6, 2012
On May 19 it was reported that an unnamed Geneva dealer had returned 251 antiquities worth some €2 million (see

earlier comments). My press release, “Looting Matters: Why Is Switzerland Featured so Frequently in the Return of Antiquities?“, PR Newswire May 29, 2009 Friday 12:01 PM GMT subsequently noted:

“In May 2009 251 antiquities worth around 2 million Euros (US $2.8 million) were returned to Italy from a Geneva-based gallery.”

One hour later another release appeared, “Phoenix Ancient Art Voluntarily Repatriates 251 Antiquities to Italy Worth $2.7 Million“, PR Newswire May 29, 2009 Friday 1:00 PM GMT.

Phoenix Ancient Art, the world’s leading dealer in rare treasures from ancient Western civilizations, announced today that it has voluntarily repatriated 251 antiquities valued at $2.7 Million (EU 2Million) to the State of Italy.

Why did it take ten days for Phoenix Ancient Art to make this statement? What prompted this latest move?

Ali Aboutaam was quoted in the release:

“We returned these ancient artifacts in the spirit of cooperation and collaboration with the international art world, and to demonstrate Phoenix’s commitment to the preservation and repatriation of national treasures to their host countries … We have, amicably settled the matter with the Italian authorities, and urge others in the art world to follow suit and also the lead of some of the world’s great museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in repatriating antiquities whose provenance may be in doubt.”

The press release suggests that the pieces were removed from archaeological contexts in Etruria and Southern Italy during the 1980s. It stress such looting was “unbeknownst to Phoenix”; in other words the pieces had been acquired in “good faith”.

C. Michael Hedqvist, who is director of the Geneva gallery of Phoenix Ancient Art, is also quoted:

“To ensure the provenance of our items, we spend much of our time verifying an art work’s pedigree. In our due diligence process we ask each seller of artwork for proof of identity, as well as for documents pertaining to how long the piece has been in circulation… The returned items were acquired by Phoenix a long time ago, without knowing of their doubtful provenance. Even though a court in Geneva in 2007 rejected the Italian claim and awarded title of the antiquities to Phoenix, proving that we were not at fault, we chose to return the disputed items to the Italian State.”

Ali and Hicham Aboutaam have yet to explain their link with an antiquity returned from Princeton to Italy.

Aboutaam’s urge that other institutions should “follow suit” and repatriate “antiquities whose provenance may be in doubt” will cause discomfort for two particular institutions:

Will these two museums be returning these two acquisitions in the near future?

Looting Matters: Operation Phoenix: Ali Aboutaam .

June 2nd, 2009

Posted In: Looting Matters, Saint Louis Art Museum