Saving Antiquities for Everyone-SAFE Beacon Awards Honoring Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino

Saving Antiquities for Everyone-SAFE Beacon Awards Honoring Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino

http://www.savingantiquities.org/event.php?eventID=257

September 8, 2011

SAFE Beacon Awards Honoring Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino

Friday October 28, 2011
New York, New York

We are pleased to present the 2011 SAFE Beacon Awards to Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino, co-authors ofChasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World’s Richest Museum, for educating the public about how museum practices affect the preservation of cultural heritage. As investigative reporters at the Los Angeles Times, their dedication to uncovering the truth was essential in breaking open the case with the J. Paul Getty Museum. Through their recent book and continued effort to raise awareness online, many will learn, some for the first time, about the devastating effects of the illicit antiquities trade.

We congratulate Jason and Ralph on their success and SAFE is proud to recognize them with these awards. Check this space often as we unveil multiple opportunities to celebrate. Stay tuned!

Chasing Aphrodite has received glowing reviews, including:

“An important book…”
The New York Review of Books

“Journalists Felch and Frammolino…have produced a detailed account of how the J. Paul Getty Museum developed its collection and responded to Italian claims about allegedly looted antiquities.”
David Gill, 2012 SAFE Beacon Award Winner, Looting Matters

“A gripping narrative spiked with vivid character sketches…a riveting cautionary tale.”
Los Angeles Times

“Brilliantly told, richly detailed, and vitally important…The authors are scrupulously balanced and keenly sensitive to the nuances of the cultural property debate.”
Roger Atwood2004 SAFE Beacon Award WinnerStealing History

“A scathing indictment of the ‘museum industry’…”
The Washington Times

Jason Felch is an investigative reporter with the Los Angeles Times. In 2006 he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Investigative Reporting for exposing the role of the J. Paul Getty Museum and other American museums in the black market for looted antiquities. His work has also been honored by Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Education Writers Association, the National Association of Science Writers, and the Society for Environmental Journalism. He lives in Pasadena, California with his wife and son.

Ralph Frammolino reported for nearly 25 years at the Los Angeles Times, where he and former colleague Jason Felch were finalists for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting for their articles about the J. Paul Getty Museum and looted antiquities. His work has also appeared in the New York Times and the Columbia Journalism Review. Frammolino is now a media consultant for various projects in Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka, where he trains working journalists on investigative reporting techniques and right to information laws.

Saving Antiquities for Everyone-SAFE Beacon Awards Honoring Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino.

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