Angkor replicated: How Cambodian workshops produce fake masterpieces, and get away with it
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Martin Polkinghorne, The Conversation
As part of my work as an archaeologist, my team and I recently discovered an ancient artists’ studio in UNESCO-listed Angkor, an area in Cambodia that was home to numerous capitals of the Khmer Empire and is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Southeast Asia.

The finest examples of Cambodian art produced at these sites during the Angkorian period (circa 800-1400CE) are recognised as among the greatest artistic masterpieces of the pre-modern world.

Sadly, the looting of such material has caused considerable problems in a world that is progressively becoming concerned about the integrity of both public and private collections.

Since 2014, art institutions and private collectors have returned 11 sculptures to Cambodia. All were looted, or illegally obtained or exported.

This represents a significant post-colonial correction in the ownership of cultural property. But for about the same amount of time that looted art has been traded between buyers and sellers, another issue has remained hidden.

Home to numerous capitals of the Khmer Empire, Angkor is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Southeast Asia. arielski/Flickr, CC BY-ND
Home to numerous capitals of the Khmer Empire, Angkor is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Southeast Asia. arielski/Flickr, CC BY-ND
Fakes have overrun the Cambodian antiquity market, their authenticity obscured by the skill of the artists who make them. Indeed, a significant proportion of the artists are so accomplished that the modern origins of their work will probably never be recognised.

A homage to Angkorian sculpture

The art of Angkor and mainland Southeast Asia is particularly vulnerable. In correspondence with me, Helen Jessup, an eminent art historian and the author of six books on Cambodian art, made the connection between war, looting, and fakes:

Civil disturbances roiling Cambodia for 30 years made access difficult and led to a thinning of the ranks of experts in the field, including within Cambodia itself. Political uncertainty enabled illicit access to ancient sites and looting was rampant. Thailand was the usual destination for the stolen objects, handled by networks of middlemen and dealers and serving as models for skilled craftsmen to replicate. Provenance issues in strife-torn regions were fudged and acquisitions increased with few questions asked.

While peace has thankfully returned to Cambodia, the lucrative production of fakes continues.

Few know more about the production of replicas than contemporary artist Jim Sanborn, who witnessed the skill of Cambodian fakers first-hand while researching an art project of his own.

He told me:

Over a four-year period I travelled back and forth to infiltrate the forgery trade in order to gain the knowledge that generations of forgers had used to age their pieces.

The result was Sanborn’s path-breaking work Without Provenance: The Making of Contemporary Antiquity. It presents sandstone sculptures made in Cambodia and falsely aged in his US studio.

Jim Sanborn is a celebrated artist with pieces in collections worldwide, but he is still seeking an exhibitor for this challenging work that exposes the faking of Khmer art. The subversion of Without Provenance is testament to the unease with which custodians of Southeast Asian art approach authenticity and provenance.

Makers and models

In 2012, I accompanied Sanborn to a workshop in rural Cambodia. Posing as an art collector, I was offered contemporary replicas as genuine Angkorian sculptures. Objects like the ones we examined are sold at international auctions for anywhere between ten to one hundred times the sale price in rural Cambodia.

Fake sculptures artificially ageing in bath of nitric acid. Jim Sanborn
Fake sculptures artificially ageing in bath of nitric acid. Jim Sanborn
We were shown numerous sculptures in various stages of production. Even with an expert’s eye, often the only clue to the sculptures’ contemporaneity was the fact that we saw them in a workshop.

The art works were created using techniques not employed to produce art for the tourist market. Polishing obscures the giveaway marks that modern tungsten-tipped chisels leave behind, for instance.

At two or three months, the carving process is relatively quick compared to the task of artificial ageing, which can take many years.

Identifying a fake sculpture is not an easy task. Artists work within a family tradition, with knowledge passed from master to apprentice. Certain practices of cultural and artistic reproduction might well be unbroken since the time of Angkor.

Master craftsmen do not copy known sculptures, but design original works in the style of a particular time period. Variations in decoration, iconography and quality are commonly used to mimic actual antiquities.

To make matters more difficult, identifying a genuine sculpture is not very simple either. Even the most accomplished connoisseur will question authentic sculptures that intentionally reference iconography and motifs from earlier periods. For example, a group of sculptures produced in the ninth century have only recently been identified as 12th century copies.

When I asked Helen Jessup about identifying fakes and their proliferation, she said:

It will probably never be certain which of the pieces acquired from as early as the 1980s are real and which are fakes, but it is fair to ask why nobody wondered why, after almost a century of diligent research and acquisition by the French, so many, and so many perfect sculptures were appearing.

Revisiting authenticity

An intentionally broken fake Angkorian sculpture being artificially aged. Jim Sanborn
An intentionally broken fake Angkorian sculpture being artificially aged. Jim Sanborn
Technical analyses are the best tests. Regrettably, these are not foolproof either. Contemporary artists use the same sources of stone as the ancients; and fakers can replace clay cores of contemporary sculptures with ancient ones to avoid detection by scientific dating techniques.

Assistant Professor Christian Fischer from the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program is an expert in the types of stone used by ancient Cambodian artists.

Fischer told me about the extent to which fakers are one step ahead of would-be experts:

Fakers are aware of the published research that can help them to improve their artificial ageing procedures. For example, from the late 1990s, the appearance of questionable sculptures showing a surface layer enriched in manganese might be related to equivalent descriptions of manganese in the academic literature. This feature is absent on notorious fakes made in the 1970s and 1980s.

We continuously change the way objects of the past are appreciated and represented in terms of the present. Angkorian sculptures have always been treasured for their aesthetic beauty and as we learn more about them, we begin to recognise their significance to those who produced and venerated them, and especially their value to Cambodians today.

The ancient sculptures of Southeast Asia embody impressive examples of human creativeness and increase cross-cultural knowledge. But how might we accept replica sculptures acquired from a market full of objects with insufficient provenance?

Fearing the potential reputational damage that will follow if they’re known to have fallen prey to fakers’ deception, some custodians of Cambodian and Southeast Asian sculptures do not seek clarity on authenticity.

Products of a faking workshop offered for sale at the site of their manufacture. Jim Sanborn
Products of a faking workshop offered for sale at the site of their manufacture. Jim Sanborn
But as problematic as they are, rigorous independent technical analyses can test the legitimacy of sculptures. In recognising fakes, custodians can come to terms with how past collecting encouraged the production of forgeries and the looting of sacred archaeological sites.

Whether real or replica, the sculptures are original works of art and worthy of celebration. They are produced by Cambodian artists with abilities equal to that of their Angkorian ancestors.

Still, custodians have a responsibility to follow a process of due diligence to ensure objects in their possession are authentic. Acknowledging the true character of the sculptures is the only way forward for caretakers who wish to address acquisition customs of the past.

Failure to do so will see both real and fake sculptures languish in storerooms, have fakes attain legitimacy as ancient, or ensure buyers are fooled again by the fakers’ skills.

Martin Polkinghorne, Research Fellow in Archaeology, Flinders University.

This article first appeared on The Conversation.

November 30th, 2016

Posted In: fakes and forgeries, vervalsing

Art world rocked by ‘genius’ £200m Old Masters forgery scandal

Adam Sherwin21/10/2016

David With The Head Of Goliath, attributed to Italian master Orazio Gentileschi. (Photo - Weiss Gallery)

They are undoubtedly the work of a genius, art experts admit. But police are now investigating a spate of brilliant Old Masters forgeries which have fooled the world’s leading auction houses and museums.

The authorities are seeking to crack the ring, thought to be the work of a highly sophisticated modern forgery workshop, based in Italy.

Around 25 “fake” Old Masters, bought and sold for £200m after bypassing expert scrutiny, are believed to be in circulation.

“Whoever has been making them is an artist of extraordinary skill” Forgery expert Dr Bendor Grosvenor

The scandal threatens to undermine faith in the authentication process of those institutions which presented them as genuine works.

A painting of Saint Jerome, sold in 2012 for $842,500, attributed to the 16th-century artist Parmigianino, is the latest work to be sent for technical tests by Sotheby’s in New York, amid concerns that it is a modern forgery.

The painting was displayed by the Metropolitan Museum in New York in 2014.

Sotheby’s was previously forced to reimburse the buyer of an £8.4 million painting, An Unknown Man, supposedly by Dutch master Frans Hals, after forensics company Orion Analytical determined that it was a fake.

Traces of 20th century synthetic materials were discovered under the paint, leading Sotheby’s to conclude that the painting was “undoubtedly” forged.

An Unknown Man attributed to Frans Hals that sold for £8.4m ($10.8m) has been declared fake (picture - Sotheby's)
An Unknown Man by “Frans Hals” that sold for $10.8m) has been declared fake (picture – Sotheby’s)

The forger is suspected of responsibility for a painting thought to be by Italian master Orazio Gentileschi that was loaned by a private lender to the National Gallery.

Painted on the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli, David with the Head of Goliath, displayed from last April, supposedly dates from 1692.

Dr Bendor Grosvenor, the BBC Fake or Fortune art expert, concluded: “For what it’s worth, I believe it is a forgery. But it took me a long time, and a flight to Berlin to see an undisputed original Gentileschi for comparison, to figure it out.”

No reason to doubt says National Gallery

The National Gallery said it performed “due diligence research” on the work, which arrived with no published provenance after being bought by a London dealer, and had “no obvious reasons to doubt” that it was authentic.

The scandal broke when Venus, a painting by German Renaissance master Lucas Cranach and bought by the Prince of Liechtenstein for £6m was seized by authorities at an exhibition in the South of France, following a criminal investigation. It was sent to the Louvre for testing.

Italian dealer named as the link

The link between the paintings is that they have passed through the hands of a previously unknown Italian, French-based dealer, Giulano Ruffini, who appeared to have discovered a string of Old Masters. “I am a collector, not an expert,” claimed Ruffini, 71, who said it was other experts who deemed the paintings to be authentic.

Richard Feigen, a leading Old Master art dealer in New York, called the affair “one of the biggest scandals in my memory”, which should make institutions “very wary about things they are offered and the sources of those things.”

However Dr Grosvenor cannot disguise a sneaking admiration for the “Moriarty of the Old Master.” “Whoever has been making them is an artist of extraordinary skill,” he wrote.

“Equally skilful is the ability to age these modern creations in such a way as to make them look centuries old. Sadly, we don’t yet know who this genius is.”

The scandal was unearthed by an investigative art journalist, Vincent Noce.

Fake or fortune?

Orazio Gentileschi – David contemplating the Head of Goliath (1692)

The “rarest and most bizarre object” in the National Gallery’s Making Colour show, the painting on a panel of semi-precious blue lapis lazuli stone creates a spectacular sky behind David. The Gentileschi was “discovered” in 2012 and sold to a private collector, who loaned it to the National Gallery. It has been returned to its lender.

Frans Hals – An Unknown Man

Authenticated by a senior curator at the Louvre, the newly-discovered painting was sold to London dealer Mark Weiss, who also handled the Gentileschi, and sold in good faith through Sotheby’s in New York for $10m in 2011.

“An in-depth technical analysis established that the work was undoubtedly a forgery,” concluded Sotheby’s which rescinded the sale and reimbursed the buyer.

Lucas Cranach – Venus with a Veil (1535)

Sold in 2013 to the Prince of Liechtenstein for £6m, Venus had been authenticated as a Cranach by scholars. Seized by French police, a new analysis suggests artificially-aged paint on a panel crated 200 years too late for the German Renaissance painter. A link to the Hals prompted Sotheby’s to investigate its own sale.

@adamsherwin10

Source: Art world rocked by ‘genius’ £200m Old Masters forgery scandal – The i newspaper online iNews

October 21st, 2016

Posted In: fakes and forgeries, vervalsing

9 of the Craziest Recent Forgery Scandals

17/10/2016

Nothing strikes fear into the heart of an art collector or museum like the possibility that a prized work of art might actually be a worthless forgery. And yet, despite the best efforts of experts to safeguard against such chicanery, fake works masquerading as priceless original continue to litter the market.

Art history is rife with high profile scams, such as that of Han van Meegeren, a disillusioned painter who developed a complicated system of baking his Old Master-style work to age it, and subsequently sold $60 million in fake Vermeers to world class museums and Nazi leader Hermann Göring during the late 1930s and early 1940s. (While current art historians are quick to slam his work as obviously inferior, Van Meegeren actually had to paint a “new” Vermeer at trial to prove he had not sold the Nazis a priceless original.)

Related: String of Suspected Old Master Fakes May Reveal ‘Biggest Art Scandal in a Century’

In recent weeks, the art world has been rocked by perhaps the biggest forgery scandal to hit the art world since Van Meegeren’s unmasking. The extent of the Old Master forgery ring is as of yet unknown, but Sotheby’s has already issued a refund to the buyer of a $10 million Frans Hals portrait, sold in 2011 in a private sale through London dealer Mark Weiss. James Martin’s Orion Analytical, a Williamstown, Massachusetts-based company which investigates artworks, found modern-day materials in the canvas, proving it to be a forgery.

Franz Hals, Portrait of a Man, one of a series of Old Master works sold by a French dealer that authorities now believe may be forgeries.

Franz Hals, Portrait of a Man, one of a series of Old Master works sold by a French dealer that authorities now believe may be forgeries.

Other paintings are now also implicated, including a Lucas Cranach the Elder, from the collection of the Prince of Liechtenstein, that was seized by French authorities from the Caumont Centre d’Art in Aix in March. An Orazio Gentileschi painting on lapis lazuli, also sold by Weiss, and a purported Parmigianino have been identified as suspect as well. Rumor has it that works by up to 25 different Old Master paintings may be involved. (For a break-down on what we know so far, read “The Frans Hals Forgery Scandal, Explained.”)

Related: Plot Thickens In Dispute Over Seized Cranach Painting

All the paintings appear to have originated with one man, an obscure French collector-turned-dealer named Giulano Ruffini. The works appear to have had next-to-no provenance, save that they came from the collection of French civil engineer André Borie. Ruffini insists he never suggested they were the real deal, and that eager dealers were the ones to declare his paintings Old Master originals.

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Venus (1531). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Venus (1531). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The art world was quick to fall in line, with London’s National Gallery displaying the Gentileschi and the Pamigianino popping up at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. At one point, the Louvre in Paris launched a fundraising campaign to buy the Hals, dubbing it a “national treasure” after it was authenticated by France’s Center for Research and Restoration.

Related: Suspected $255 Million Old Master Forgery Scandal Continues to Rock the Art World

The fact that so-called experts were fooled suggests that connoisseurship, long the gold standard of Old Master authentication—which does not rely on science but a less tangible ability to sense the presence of a great artist’s hand—can no longer be relied upon.

Orazio Gentileschi, David Contemplating the Head of Goliath. Courtesy of the Weiss Gallery.

Orazio Gentileschi, David Contemplating the Head of Goliath. Courtesy of the Weiss Gallery.

Perhaps most frightening of all, there is no telling how many fakes still lie in plain sight, accepted as originals by experts and the public alike. Famed contemporary forgers such as Wolfgang Beltracchi and Mark Landis, for instance, have infiltrated many museum collections. In 2014, Switzerland’s Fine Art Expert Institute estimated that 50 percent of all work on the market is fake—a figure that was quickly second-guessed, but remains troubling.

Related: Artist Hides Forgery in Major London Museum

As artnet News continues to follow this developing story, here are just a few of the most high-profile art forgery cases that have come to light in recent years.

James Martin's expert report shows the signatures from four Knoedler paintings that were purported Jackson Pollocks. The top two signatures are quite similar. The bottom right signature shows signs that the name was first traced onto the canvas using a sharp tool, and is very similar to the signature on the bottom left, which is misspelled "Pollok." Photo: James Martin.

James Martin’s expert report shows the signatures from four Knoedler paintings that were purported Jackson Pollocks. The top two signatures are quite similar. The bottom right signature shows signs that the name was first traced onto the canvas using a sharp tool, and is very similar to the signature on the bottom left, which is misspelled “Pollok.” Courtesy of James Martin.

1. Knoedler Forgery Ring
Glafira Rosales, an obscure Long Island art dealer, her boyfriend, and his brother enlisted Pei-Shen Qian, a Chinese artist in Queens, to paint Abstract Expressionist canvases in the style of such masters as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell, and others. The venerable Knoedler gallery, which closed in 2011 as the forgeries came to light, still claims they believed Rosales’s story that the works were part of an undocumented collection sold directly by the artists to an anonymous “Mr. X.”

Related: Knoedler Fraud Trial Settles

Whether or not the gallery was in on the scheme (one of the many claims against Knoedler went to trial earlier this year but was settled before gallery president Ann Freedman could testify), they still sold the worthless works for $80 million, leaving a slew of lawsuits, some still unresolved, in their wake.

Uzbekistan's State Art Museum, Tashkent. Courtesy of Abdullais4u via Wikimedia.

Uzbekistan’s State Art Museum, Tashkent. Courtesy of Abdullais4u via Wikimedia.

2. An Inside Job in Uzbekistan
Even possession of an original work of art doesn’t protect you from worry. The Uzbek State Art Museum, for instance, discovered that over the course of 15 years, its collection was systematically pillaged by a group of employees, at least three of whom have since been convicted.

Over 25 works by European artists, including Renaissance great Lorenzo di Credi and modern Russian artists Victor Ufimtsevand Alexander Nikolaevich, were swapped out for copies. The employees then sold the originals on the black market for a pittance.

There are many forgeries of Alberto Giacometti's <em>Walking Man</em>. Courtesy of Cornell University Museum.

There are many forgeries of Alberto Giacometti’s Walking Man. Courtesy of Cornell University Museum.

3. Thousands of Fake Bronzes Sold for Millions
A forgery ring busted in 2011 is still having repercussions across the Alberto Giacometti market. Dutch Giacometti forger Robert Driessen made €8 million ($8.9 million) selling forged sculptures, along with thousands of fake bronzes, before his misdeeds were discovered. In 2015, the case again made headlines when a German dealer was caught trying to sell one of the works still at large to an undercover agent.

The State Art and Sculpture Museum in Ankara, Turkey. Courtesy of Husshho via Wikimedia Commons.

The State Art and Sculpture Museum in Ankara, Turkey. Courtesy of Husshho via Wikimedia Commons.

4. A $250 Million Heist in Turkey
Forgeries again came into play at Turkey’s State Art and Sculpture Museum in Ankara, where a group of museum officials and criminals are believed to have teamed up to steal some 302 works from the institution between 2005 and 2009. The crime was discovered in 2012, when the museum realized that 46 pieces in the collection had been replaced by copies. Another 30 works also raised suspicion.

The case was solved in late 2014 thanks to a tip from an anonymous caller.

Eric Ian Hornak Spoutz lecturing at the Washington County museum of Fine Arts in 2013. Photo: Natasha M. Spoutz, via Wikimedia.

Eric Ian Hornak Spoutz lecturing at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in 2013. Courtesy of Natasha M. Spoutz, via Wikimedia.

5. An Art Dealer Sells Fakes Through eBay
Using a variety of aliases, Michigan-based dealer Eric Ian Hornak Spoutz created fake paperwork to help sell dozens forged works by Willem de KooningJoan Mitchell, and other artists. Because the transactions were conducted through eBay, Spoutz was charged with wire fraud.

He may have even taken in the Smithsonian, which has six works in its the collection that originated with Spoutz.

Two Civil Guard agents inspect one of the fake Joan Miró drawingsPhoto via: Guardia Civil

Two Civil Guard agents inspect one of the fake Joan Miró drawings. Courtesy of Guardia Civil.

6. A Covert Investigation Blows Open a Spanish Forgery Ring
A Spanish forgery ring dealing in fake Joan MiróPablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse drawings was uncovered by Spain’s Civil Guard in January 2015 after a six-month investigation dubbed Operación Mirones (Operation Voyeurs). The authorities first spotted the fakes entering the country in July 2014, but opted to put the suspect under surveillance.

The investigation uncovered a Zaragoza-based art dealer’s scheme to sell the counterfeit works for hundreds of thousands of Euros, and nine fakes were recovered during a raid that put a stop to the illicit operation.

The artist Lee Ufan.Photo: Studio Lee Ufan Courtesy Château Mouton Rothschild

The artist Lee Ufan. Courtesy Studio Lee/Ufan Château Mouton Rothschild

7. Lee Ufan Authenticates Forgeries
In an unusual case, South Korean art star Lee Ufan claimed 13 suspected forgeries as his own original work, even after South Korean art dealer named Hyeon admitted they were counterfeits. Seoul police began investigating the case in February, and indicated that there were as many a 50 fake works at hand when Hyeon was indicted in June.

Nevertheless, Ufan was unswayed by the evidence, insisting that “an artist can recognize his own piece at a glance.”

Laurent Kraemer. Courtesy of photographer Jean-Daniel Lorieux/Kraemer Gallery.

Laurent Kraemer. Courtesy of photographer Jean-Daniel Lorieux/Kraemer Gallery.

8. Furniture can be forged too…
In June, antiques dealers Laurent Kraemer, head of Paris’s venerable Kraemer Gallery, and chair specialist Bill Pallot, were arrested on suspicion of selling the Palace of Versailles four counterfeit medallion back chairs for €1.7 million ($1.9 million). Counted as “National Treasures,” the chairs were thought to be among a group of 13 created by Louis Delanois for the Palace living room in 1769, where they belonged to Louis XV’s last mistress, the countess du Barry.

Related: Versailles Staffers Caught Selling Counterfeit Tickets

The problem is that there are now more than 12 chairs from the set floating around (the 13th, a larger version made specially for the King, is thought to be lost). The Kraemer Gallery maintained its innocence, but withdrew from the Biennale des Antiquaires, which was held in Paris in September.

Orlan. Photo courtesy Orlan.

Orlan. Photo courtesy Orlan.

9. But probably not facial modifications…
French artist Orlan sued American pop star Lady Gaga for forgery after the release of the 2011 hit video “Born This Way,” but ultimately lost her case. Orlan pointed out similarities to her piece Bumpload (1989), in which she added prosthetic ridges to her face, and Woman With Head (1996), which featured a decapitated head on a table. After losing her $31.7 million lawsuit, Orlan was ordered to pay the singer and her record label €20,000 ($22,000)

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Source: 9 of Art History’s Most Surprising Forgery Scandals | artnet News

October 19th, 2016

Posted In: fakes and forgeries, vervalsing

Serious doubts grow over Old Masters sold by Giulano Ruffini

Serious doubts grow over Old Masters sold by Giulano Ruffini

An Unknown Man was believed to have been by Frans Hals and was sold by Sotheby’s in 2011—the auction house has now cast serious doubt over its authenticity

In the latest development in a growing scandal over several Old Master paintings, the authenticity of which are in serious doubt, Sotheby’s New York provided new details on the rescinding of a 2011 sale to a US collector of a portrait sold in good faith as a Frans Hals. The auction house confirmed it reimbursed the buyer “in full” after discovering the painting was a forgery, which was first reported by our sister paper, the Journal des Arts, on 30 September.

The painting was sold in 2011 by Sotheby’s and the London dealer Mark Weiss to Seattle-based collector Richard Hedreen for $10m. It was purchased for €3m by Mark Weiss from Giulano Ruffini, whose estate near Parma was raided by French and Italian police last April. Before that, the Louvre had tried to buy the portrait, which was declared a “national treasure” in France.

Now, Sotheby’s indicates that “after receiving consent” from Weiss, it informed Hedreen of “a possible issue with the authenticity of the painting” and that a subsequent “in-depth technical analysis established that the work was  a forgery.”  Sotheby’s confirms it then “rescinded the sale and reimbursed the client in full”, adding that the company means to “keep its promises when problems arise”. Weiss, who has not paid back his 50% share of the sale by Sotheby’s, says further technical analysis is needed.

Sotheby’s acted “after the seizure by French police last March of a work attributed to Cranach”, which had been sold to the Prince of Liechtenstein by Colnaghi Gallery. As we revealed at the time, this painting also belonged to Ruffini.

Sotheby’s indicates that the study of the painting it believed was by Frans Hals was undertaken by “one of the leading experts on the field”, Orion Analytical, before being “peer reviewed by another leading conservation scientist”. The analyses “showed the presence of modern materials used in the painting”. Sotheby’s says in the statement that a cross-section of the painting revealed “trace evidence in ground and paint layers” containing “synthetic materials first produced in the 20th century”.

Ruffini told us he had sold dozens of paintings over the past few decades. But he never claimed any of them were by Old Masters. “I am not an expert, only a private collector,” he insisted. “If these paintings were later attributed to Correggio, Gentileschi or the Bruegels, or any other great artist, the experts, the dealers and the curators are responsible.” The dealers in question respond that these works have impressed the best experts, including the Louvre’s curators and laboratory.

“[Mark] Weiss, strongly believes, as do others in the museum and scientific world, that more forensic analysis needs to be done before making a final judgement on this painting,” says a spokeswoman for Weiss Gallery, referring to the painting attributed to Frans Hals.

Source: Serious doubts grow over Old Masters sold by Giulano Ruffini

October 12th, 2016

Posted In: fakes and forgeries, vervalsing

13 of Lee U-fan’s paintings confirmed to be forged

Posted : 2016-06-03 16:53Updated : 2016-06-03 17:42
음성듣기
Lee U-fan’s “Point”

By Yun Suh-young

Police have confirmed that several of artist Lee U-fan’s works were forged.

The announcement on Thursday is based on the results of a National Forensic Service probe. Suspicions about the works arose in 2012.

Thirteen of Lee’s works _ four that were bought by private collectors, eight kept by distributors and sellers and one that was sold at a local auction _ have been confirmed as forgeries. The 13 pieces were compared with Lee’s six genuine works exhibited at local museums.

Lee is best known in Korea and overseas for his “dansaekhwa” series, or monochrome paintings. His works are also among the most expensive pieces by a Korean artist. His “From Line No. 760219” was sold for $2.16 million at a Sotheby’s auction in New York in 2014. Last month, one of his “Wind” series sold for $922,000 at an auction in Hong Kong.

Police started their investigation in June last year after allegations that some of Lee’s forged works were being sold and distributed. Forged paintings of Lee’s “From Point” and “From Line” series were claimed to have been sold for billions of won in several galleries in Insa-dong between 2012 and 2013.

Last month, police arrested and investigated a man suspected of directing the forgery of Lee’s works. Police are investigating another artist for allegedly forging several of Lee’s paintings.

Lee, who said he knew nothing about the forgeries of his paintings when the claims were first made, said in January through a legal representative that if there are forged works purported to be his being sold, then he is the biggest victim of the scandal and would cooperate fully with any police investigation.

Lee is in France preparing for an exhibition. His attorney, Choi Soon-yong, said it was difficult for Lee to return to Korea immediately due to the exhibition but hoped the investigation would end soon so there would be no further speculation about Lee’s works and no further damage would occur.

The forgery confirmation is likely to spur further investigations. Claims have long been made that forgeries of the work of other famous artists, such as Chung Kyung-ja and Park Soo-geun, are also being traded.

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Source: 13 of Lee U-fan’s paintings confirmed to be forged

June 4th, 2016

Posted In: fakes and forgeries, vervalsing

‘Imagine how easy Keith Haring is to fake’

‘Imagine how easy Keith Haring is to fake’

Richard Polsky. Photo: Bill Kane

Last October Richard Polsky, the San Francisco art dealer who wrote I Bought Andy Warhol (2003), started an authentication service for the artist’s works, driven by the dissolution of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts’ authentication committee four years earlier. Now, Polsky has announced that he is taking on authentication of works by Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

The Art Newspaper: There are some collecting fields, such as sports memorabilia, where fakes are said to outnumber the real thing. Can you give us a rough idea of what percentage of Warhols on the market are suspicious?
Richard Polsky: In terms of what I’m seeing for authentication, it’s probably 60/40 in favour of fakes. In terms of what you see at galleries, it’s probably more like 10% fakes. Warhol has never been bigger, and if you are a serious blue-chip collector, you need a Warhol. As the prices go up, more fakes appear.

What about Haring and Basquiat?
There’s a much higher percentage with Haring. I would say Haring is [number] one, Basquiat, two and Warhol three in terms of volume of fakes. Haring was extremely prolific—the subway drawings, for example—he said he did thousands over the course of three years. The other thing is that Haring could do a sketch of a barking dog or radiant baby in just a couple minutes—imagine how easy that is to fake.

Are there any particularly memorable fakes that you’ve seen so far?
A man from North Carolina called me and said he bought a wooden carving of a cat at a flea market, signed on the bottom “Andy Warhol.” I started laughing because Andy really didn’t do things like that. In that case, I didn’t even get involved.

How important are signatures with these artists?
I would say they are not crucial with any of them. With Warhol his assistants signed pieces, his mother signed pieces, Ivan Karp [a Pop art dealer] signed pieces. What is crucial is what the work looks like, what material was used and obviously the back story, which includes information about the artist’s intent. Is this a work that Warhol wanted to be public, or something a friend fished out of the trash?

What giveaways betray works as fake Harings or Basquiats?
With an authentic Haring what you’re looking for is an unbroken line. He was a savant of some sort: he could start a drawing on the left side of the canvas and keep going. If you see a “Haring” drawing where it looks like a line has been erased or reworked, it’s probably not a Haring. For Basquiat you can usually tell a forgery because it won’t have his spontaneity—the composition will look too perfect.

Given the current climate of fear over authentication, aren’t you afraid of being sued?
That was the first question from my colleagues: half of them thought I was a genius, the other half thought I was an idiot. The answer is no. If you go back to the Warhol authentication board, a collector had to give them permission to rubber stamp in ink the word “Denied” on the back of the artwork. If you got the stamp, you were screwed, and if you asked them why, they wouldn’t tell you.
I believe in being transparent. If I turn down your painting you get a two-page letter from me outlining why. You might be bummed out, but being treated fairly tends to reduce anger. Of course I also have a lawyer and a disclaimer. And there’s just not as much financial incentive to sue me. There’s a difference between suing an estate worth hundreds of millions and suing an individual.

I can’t imagine that your authentication carries as much weight as the estates did though?
Not yet, that’s correct. I tell potential clients since we’re relatively new, I think an authentication letter from me will be helpful in private transactions. Nobody has tested the auction waters yet, but I think this is coming.

Source: ‘Imagine how easy Keith Haring is to fake’

June 3rd, 2016

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May 13th, 2016

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Brett Whiteley fake art: Dealer and conservator guilty of Australia’s biggest art fraud

Mark RussellMay 12, 2016 – 5:06PM

Art dealer Peter Gant has been found guilty of selling fake Brett Whiteley paintings.

Art dealer Peter Gant has been found guilty of selling fake Brett Whiteley paintings. Photo: Dominic Lorrimer

Two men have been found guilty of Australia’s biggest art fraud, where fake paintings by famous Australian artist Brett Whiteley were sold for $3.6 million.

Art dealer Peter Gant and art conservator Mohamed Aman Siddique had been accused of pursuing a joint criminal enterprise to create three paintings – Blue Lavender Bay, Orange Lavender Bay and Through the Window – in the style of Brett Whiteley, who died from a heroin overdose in 1992.

The Crown claimed Mr Siddique painted the artworks in his Easy Street, Collingwood studio from 2007, and Mr Gant then passed them off to unsuspecting buyers as original 1988 Brett Whiteley paintings.

One of the paintings presented as evidence in court.

Blue Lavender Bay, one of the paintings presented as evidence in court. Photo: Jason South

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The Blue Lavender Bay painting was sold for $2.5 million to Sydney Swans chairman Andrew Pridham in 2007 and the Orange Lavender Bay sold for $1.1 million to Sydney luxury car dealer Steven Nasteski in 2009.

The Crown claimed a third fake painting, Through the Window, was offered for sale by Mr Gant for $950,000.

The men’s defence barristers argued copies of Whiteley paintings were made in a locked storeroom but the sold paintings were Whiteley originals bought from the artist’s manager by Mr Gant and kept in storage for nearly 20 years.

No explanation was given as to what happened to the copies Mr Siddique admitted to painting in his studio.

It was claimed the authentic paintings were not Whiteley’s best work as he had been a heroin addict past his prime in 1988, creating ‘inconsistent’ art and selling it out the back door to support his drug habit or avoid tax.

A Supreme Court jury on Thursday found Mr Gant, 60, guilty of two counts of obtaining a financial advantage by deception and one of attempting to obtain a financial advantage by deception involving the three artworks.

Muhammad Aman Siddique

Muhammad Aman Siddique Photo: Ken Irwin

Mr Siddique, 67, was found guilty of two counts of obtaining a financial advantage by deception and one count of attempting to obtain a financial advantage by deception.

In her closing address to the jury, Crown prosecutor Susan Borg said the art fraud had its origins after Mr Gant bought an authentic Whiteley painting, View From The Sitting Room Window, Lavender Bay, at auction for $1,650,000 in March 2007.

Ms Borg said this painting was then sent to Mr Siddique’s Collingwood studio a short time later and Mr Gant used it as a blueprint to create fake paintings.

The prosecutor said much had been made during the trial of how art dealers from esteemed auction houses were convinced the three paintings were real.

“Auction houses that work on a commission basis, on the sale of such work, you might think they might have a vested interest in saying how terrific something is …” she said.

Wendy Whiteley, widow of Australian artist Brett whiteley leave the supreme Court of Melbourne. Photo by Jesse Marlow. Friday 22nd April 2016. Wendy Whiteley, widow of Australian artist Brett Whiteley leave the supreme Court of Melbourne. Photo by Jesse Marlow. Friday 22nd April 2016.

Wendy Whiteley, widow of Australian artist Brett Whiteley.  Photo: Jesse Marlow

Ms Borg said none of the art dealers had the same intimate knowledge of Brett Whiteley’s work as his widow, Wendy, who was adamant the paintings were fakes.

What the jury was not told during the trial was how police suspected more forgeries had been created in Siddique’s Collingwood studio and sold but there was simply not enough evidence to prove it.

The Crown was also not allowed to introduce evidence from Richard Simon over a conversation he claimed to have had with Mr Siddique when delivering a number of doors to his Collingwood studio. The eccentric Whiteley was known to paint many artworks on doors.

Mr Simon claimed he argued with Mr Siddique over the quality of the door frames in November in front of Mr Gant.

“I said to him (Mr Siddique) that he knew what he was getting, that he was getting oversized doors,” Mr Simon told police.

“He (Mr Siddique) then said, ‘The artwork to be painted on these doors is worth over a million dollars, I can’t have joins’.”

Ms Borg argued Mr Simon’s evidence was fundamental to the Crown case as it allegedly showed how Mr Gant and Mr Siddique were involved in a joint criminal conspiracy.

Ms Borg said if Mr Simon’s evidence was excluded, the Crown case against the two men would be considerably weakened.

Both Mr Siddique and Mr Gant denied the conversation ever took place and their lawyers argued it would be extremely prejudicial if Mr Simon was allowed to tell the jury what he claimed to have heard.

Ruling the evidence inadmissable, Justice Michael Croucher questioned why anyone who was part of an agreement to create paintings in the style of Brett Whiteley would then tell someone that these things might be worth a million dollars?

Ms Borg wanted Gant and Siddique remanded in custody but Justice Croucher agreed to extend their bail until next Tuesday when the case would return to court for a mention.

The pre-sentence hearing for the two men is not expected to be held until June.

Source: Brett Whiteley fake art: Dealer and conservator guilty of Australia’s biggest art fraud

May 12th, 2016

Posted In: fakes and forgeries, vervalsing

Art forger goes straight selling £5,000 fakes

Robert Mendick , Chief Reporter

These masterpieces should be worth in the region of a half a billion pounds. Except they are fakes produced by David Henty, a convicted forger who produced them in the living room of his house by the seaside Brighton.

Mr Henty was exposed by The Telegraph a little over a year ago for selling his copies on eBay, duping hundreds, if not thousands, of the internet auction site’s customers in the process.

But proving there’s no such thing as bad publicity, Mr Henty has turned the notoriety to his advantage.

“Since you did those stories, I have had quite a few commissions. I can’t thank The Telegraph enough.”David Henty, master forger on going straight

The Telegraph investigation, which prompted interest from newspapers and television stations around the world, has led to Mr Henty going straight.

At the end of the month, an art gallery will stage an exhibition of his copies of masterpieces by the likes of van Gogh, Picasso and Modigliani.

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With paintings priced at up to £5,000 a time, Mr Henty is expecting to do decent business.

Convicted forger David Henty
David Henty Credit: Andrew Hasson for The Telegraph

“Since you did those stories, I have had quite a few commissions,” Mr Henty said. “People read about me in The Telegraph and elsewhere and sent me letters requesting I do copies for them of masterpieces.

“As a result, I decided to go straight and business is brilliant. I can’t thank The Telegraph enough.”

At the age of 58, and after a career in crime, the admission from Mr Henty is a bold one.

He was jailed for five years in the mid 1990s for forging thousands of fake British passports which he planned to sell to anxious Hong Kong citizens ahead of the handover to China.

The scam would have earned him a £1 million and might have worked, not least if he hadn’t mis-spelt the words ‘Britanic’ and ‘Magesty’. He went to jail a second time in Spain for selling stolen cars.

Convicted forger David Henty
David Henty Credit: Andrew Hasson for The Telegraph

His eBay scam involved copying works by slightly less famous – and usually dead – artists, luring buyers in with claims that the paintings had been found in attics and in house clearance sales and that the authenticity could not be guaranteed.

In fact, Mr Henty knew the artwork couldn’t be genuine because he was churning the paintings out in his living room, as he later confessed when confronted by The Telegraph.

It was hard for him to conceal he was the artist behind the fakes, not least because he drives around in a car with the personalised number plate “V9OGH” in self-recognition of his skills as a counterfeiter of van Gogh’s work.

“I think eBay has had its day for fake art,” he said, “For the last few months I have been concentrating on these masterpiece copies. I have done a lot of research. I have been to the galleries and studied them in the flesh. The paintings are all the exact size of the originals.

Convicted forger David Henty
David Henty Credit: Andrew Hasson for The Telegraph

“I have got 30 or 40 paintings for the exhibition. I have just done a 6ft Francis bacon that I am really pleased with. I have tried to get them as accurate as possible.”

The exhibition at the No Walls Gallery in Brighton will be his first as a legitimate copier. The opening night will be attended by Peter James, the best-selling author of crime fiction who has just completed a book about real life criminals in Brighton written in conjunction with Graham Bartlett, the city’s former chief superintendent, who arrested Mr Henty for the passport scam.

Convicted forger David Henty
David Henty Credit: Andrew Hasson for The Telegraph

The pair – detective and villain – have struck up an unlikely friendship in recent months. Mr Henty’s passport scam is a chapter in the book, entitled ‘Death Comes Knocking’ and which is published in the summer.

The endorsement of Mr Henty’s art by Mr James, who has sold 17 million books worldwide, will further boost his chances of artistic success.

A satellite television channel is also planning to make a programme around Mr Henty in which one of his fakes will hang with genuine masterpieces in a gallery.

Contestants have to spot the forgery. Whether they succeed or not will be testament to Mr Henty’s skills as a master forger.

Source: Art forger goes straight selling £5,000 fakes

May 8th, 2016

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November 23rd, 2015

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In De Volkskrant van 14 oktober 2015, pagina V11, stond een kort artikel: Kunstwerken krijgen hun eigen DNA. Wetenschappers van de State University New York zouden een unieke, synthetische DNA-code ontwikkeld hebben waarmee kunstwerpen kunnen worden gemarkeerd. Via opname in een database zou dan kunnen worden gecontroleerd of een kunstwerk vals is.

Synthetische DNA- codes om gestolen kunstwerken op te sporen of, zoals nu weer wordt beweerd, vervalsingen te herkennen, zijn een periodiek terugkerende hype die in de praktijk nog nooit tot enig resultaat heeft geleid.
Het heeft geen enkele zin bestaande kunstwerken exact na te maken om ze dan als origineel te verkopen. Han van Meegeren kopieerde geen kunstwerken, maar maakte zijn eigen Vermeers, pastiches naar Vermeer. De vervalste Jackson Pollocks die afgelopen decennia verkocht werden door de Knoedler Gallery in New York waren pastiches naar Pollock en geen kopieen, van bestaande Pollocks. Wolfgang Beltracchi in Duitsland verdiende over vele jaren miljoenen met vervalsingen van Duitse expressionistische schilderijen.
De Nederlandse ‘meestervervalser’ – wat heb ik een hekel aan dat woord ‘meester’ – Geert Jan Jansen kopieerde geen Karel Appels, Miro’s of Monets, maar schilderde in de stijl van deze kunstenaars en wist, totdat hij in Frankrijk ontmaskerd werd als vervalser, aanzienlijke sommen geld daarmee te verdienen. De inmiddels overleden Eric Hebborn, vervalser van Corot, CastiglioneMantegna, Van Dyck, Poussin, Ghisi, Tiepolo, Rubens, Jan Breughel en Piranesi. veroorzaakte het schaamrood op de kaken van conservatoren die stonken in zijn vervalsingen.
Al deze vervalsers maakten pastiches van beroemde meesters; daar had geen DNA tegen geholpen. (Synthetisch) DNA waarmee schilderijen gemarkeerd worden, heeft slechts zin, en dan nog heel weinig, indien kunstenaars er een gewoonte van maken, tijdens de productie van hun kunst DNA toe te voegen. Dat moeten ze dan wel doen bij alles dat ze maken. Mochten er in de toekomst werken op de markt komen waar twijfel bestaat over de authenticiteit dan zou het ontbreken van de DNA markering kunnen betekenen dat er sprake is van een vervalsing.
Let wel: ‘mocht’ en ‘zou kunnen’. Het kan altijd nog zo zijn dat het betreffende werk dateert uit een periode dat de kunstenaar nog geen DNA markeringen gebruikte, of dat hij/zij de markering nagelaten/vergeten heeft op een werk.
De unieke DNA-code moet worden opgeslagen in een database. Wie produceert dit synthetisch DNA, wie gaat de database beheren, hoe vind je DNA terug op een kunstwerk, wat heb je daar voor apparatuur voor nodig, moet het kunstwerk getransporteerd worden naar de beheerder van de database, is er laboratoriumondertzoek nodig om de uniciteit van het DNA te determineren? Er zullen ongetwijfeld nog meer vragen te bedenken zijn.
Volgens het Volkskrantartikel zijn de kosten verbonden aan gebruik van de DNA-code € 135,00 per kunstwerk. Is dat wat het kost om synthetisch DNA te verkrijgen en aan te brengen? Ik kan mij niet voorstellen dat dit bedrag alle kosten dekt indien er een dispuut ontstaat over de toeschrijving van een kunstwerk.
Haken en ogen…en niet weinig. Ik verwacht dat ook dit DNA-initiatief, evenals vorige, een zachte dood zal sterven.
Iets anders: dat oplichters als Beltracchi, Jansen, Hebborn en Vermeer velen financieel slachtofferden, maar desondanks bewondering oogst(t)en zie ik als een absurditeit.
Ton Cremers

 

October 15th, 2015

Posted In: vervalsing

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(Synthetisch) DNA op kunstwerken helpt niet tegen vervalsingen

In De Volkskrant van 14 oktober 2015, pagina V11, stond een kort artikel: Kunstwerken krijgen hun eigen DNA. Wetenschappers van de State University New York zouden een unieke, synthetische DNA-code ontwikkeld hebben waarmee kunstwerpen kunnen worden gemarkeerd. Via opname in een database zou dan kunnen worden gecontroleerd of een kunstwerk vals is.

Synthetische DNA- codes om gestolen kunstwerken op te sporen of, zoals nu weer wordt beweerd, vervalsingen te herkennen, zijn een periodiek terugkerende hype die in de praktijk nog nooit tot enig resultaat heeft geleid.
Het heeft geen enkele zin bestaande kunstwerken exact na te maken om ze dan als origineel te verkopen. Han van Meegerenkopieerde geen kunstwerken, maar maakte zijn eigen Vermeers, pastiches naar Vermeer. De vervalste Jackson Pollocks die afgelopen decennia verkocht werden door de Knoedler Gallery in New York waren pastiches naar Pollock en geen kopieen, van bestaande Pollocks. Wolfgang Beltracchi in Duitsland verdiende over vele jaren miljoenen met vervalsingen van Duitse expressionistische schilderijen.
De Nederlandse ‘meestervervalser’ – wat heb ik een hekel aan dat woord ‘meester’ – Geert Jan Jansen kopieerde geen Karel Appels, Miro’s of Monets, maar schilderde in de stijl van deze kunstenaars en wist, totdat hij in Frankrijk ontmaskerd werd als vervalser, aanzienlijke sommen geld daarmee te verdienen. De inmiddels overleden Eric Hebborn, vervalser van Corot,Castiglione,Mantegna, Van Dyck, Poussin, Ghisi, Tiepolo, Rubens, Jan Breughel and Piranesi. veroorzaakte het schaamrood op de kaken van conservatoren die stonken in zijn vervalsingen.
Al deze vervalsers maakten pastiches van beroemde meesters; daar had geen DNA tegen geholpen. (Synthetisch) DNA waarmee schilderijen gemarkeerd worden, heeft slechts zin, en dan nog heel weinig, indien kunstenaars er een gewoonte van maken, tijdens de productie van hun kunst DNA toe te voegen. Dat moeten ze dan wel doen bij alles dat ze maken. Mochten er in de toekomst werken op de markt komen waar twijfel bestaat over de authenticiteit dan zou het ontbreken van de DNA markering kunnen betekenen dat er sprake is van een vervalsing.
Let wel: ‘mocht’ en ‘zou kunnen’. Het kan altijd nog zo zijn dat het betreffende werk dateert uit een periode dat de kunstenaar nog geen DNA markeringen gebruikte, of dat hij/zij de markering nagelaten/vergeten heeft op een werk.
De unieke DNA-code moet worden opgeslagen in een database. Wie produceert dit synthetisch DNA, wie gaat de database beheren, hoe vind je DNA terug op een kunstwerk, wat heb je daar voor apparatuur voor nodig, moet het kunstwerk getransporteerd worden naar de beheerder van de database, is er laboratoriumondertzoek nodig om de uniciteit van het DNA te determineren? Er zullen ongetwijfeld nog meer vragen te bedenken zijn.
Volgens het Volkskrantartikel zijn de kosten verbonden aan gebruik van de DNA-code € 135,00 per kunstwerk. Is dat wat het kost om synthetisch DNA te verkrijgen en aan te brengen? Ik kan mij niet voorstellen dat dit bedrag alle kosten dekt indien er een dispuut ontstaat over de toeschrijving van een kunstwerk.
Haken en ogen…en niet weinig. Ik verwacht dat ook dit DNA-initiatief, evenals vorige, een zachte dood zal sterven.
Iets anders: dat oplichters als Beltracchi, Jansen, Hebborn en Vermeer velen financieel slachtofferden, maar desondanks bewondering oogst(t)en zie ik als een absurditeit.

Source: (Synthetisch) DNA op kunstwerken helpt niet tegen vervalsingen

October 15th, 2015

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September 16th, 2013

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Hollander vervalste 1300 sculpturen

http://www.nd.nl/artikelen/2013/april/10/hollander-vervalste-1300-sculpturen

April 12, 2013

Hollander vervalste 1300 sculpturen

 

De Nederlander Robert Driessen heeft zo’n dertienhonderd valse sculpturen gemaakt, vooral in de stijl van de Zwitserse beeldhouwer Alberto Giacometti. Daarmee verdiende hij circa drie miljoen euro. Dat heeft Driessen gezegd tegen het Duitse weekblad Der Spiegel. De politie ging er eerder van uit dat Driessen zo’n duizend sculpturen had nagemaakt.

Een medewerker van Der Spiegel ontmoette de Nederlander, die aangaf het tijd de vinden dat de wereld hem kent, in een café aan het strand in Thailand. De 54-jarige Driessen wordt gezien als een van de meest succesvolle kunstvervalsers, hoewel hij vooralsnog nauwelijks in de media is geweest. Hij woont sinds acht jaar in Thailand, waar hij een café bezit.

Sommige van Driessens Giacometti-sculpturen sloten zo sterk aan bij de stijl van de kunstenaar, dat Driessen denkt dat ze de in 1966 overleden Giacometti zouden hebben aangestaan. “Na een tijdje had ik Giacometti letterlijk in de vingers.”

De twee mededaders van Driessen zitten in Duitsland in een gevangenis. Aangezien Driessen in Europa wordt gezocht, mocht het weekblad van de Nederlander niet bekendmaken waar de ontmoeting exact plaatsvond.

Driessen maakte dertig jaar lang vervalsingen, waaronder behalve sculpturen ook schilderijen. Hoeveel vervalsingen hij exact heeft gemaakt, weet Driessen niet precies. “Ik heb het niet bijgehouden.”

Gratis Nieuws – Nederlands Dagblad.

April 12th, 2013

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June 23rd, 2011

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DEN BOSCH – Een 61-jarige Eindhovense kunsthandelaar hoorde woensdag in hoger beroep 11 maanden celstraf tegen zich eisen, waarvan 6 voorwaardelijk, op verdenking van oplichting. Hij zou vervalste schilderijen hebben verkocht van de Arnhemse kunstenaar Klaas Gubbels, bekend van zijn stillevens van tafels, stoelen en koffiekannen.

meer:


via Cel geëist tegen kunsthandelaar die vervalsingen verkocht – Eindhoven Stad – Regio – ED.

March 16th, 2011

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AMSTERDAM – Een galerie in Amsterdam betaalt 50.000 euro aan degene die met bewijzen komt dat werken van kunstenaar Anton Heyboer uit de periode 1952 tot en met 1960 die te koop worden aangeboden, niet door de kunstenaar zelf geëtst, gedrukt of gemaakt zijn.

Dat heeft een woordvoerder van de Anton Heyboer Winkel vandaag laten weten.

De galerie verkoopt al veertig jaar werken van Heyboer (1924-2005). Een paar jaar geleden kreeg de winkel een groot aantal werken in bezit die in de jaren vijftig zijn gemaakt. Ze waren afkomstig van een vriend van Heyboer, die in 1998 stierf.

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via 50.000 euro voor tip Heyboervervalsingen – Kunst.

February 20th, 2011

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Stel, je koopt een paar mooie schilderijen. Van ‘De Ploeg’, het Groningse kunstcollectief, bijvoorbeeld. Maar eenmaal opgehangen boven de bank, bekruipt je toch het gevoel dat ze vals zijn. Dat overkwam een kunstkoper uit Groningen. Al jaren probeert hij zijn gelijk te halen voor de rechtbank. Maar de Nederlandse wetgeving maakt het hem daarbij niet gemakkelijk. Een gesprek met Sander Kooistra, auteur van het boek ‘Valse Kunst’, over kunstvervalsing in Nederland.

via NOS Nieuws – ‘De Nederlandse rechters weten niets van kunst’.

February 8th, 2011

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Stel, je koopt een paar mooie schilderijen. Van ‘De Ploeg’, het Groningse kunstcollectief, bijvoorbeeld. Maar eenmaal opgehangen boven de bank, bekruipt je toch het gevoel dat ze vals zijn. Dat overkwam een kunstkoper uit Groningen. Al jaren probeert hij zijn gelijk te halen voor de rechtbank. Maar de Nederlandse wetgeving maakt het hem daarbij niet gemakkelijk. Een gesprek met Sander Kooistra, auteur van het boek ‘Valse Kunst’, over kunstvervalsing in Nederland.

via NOS Nieuws – ‘De Nederlandse rechters weten niets van kunst’.

February 8th, 2011

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February 8th, 2011

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STUTTGART – Een rechtbank in de Duitse stad Stuttgart heeft donderdag drie mensen tot ieder twee jaar gevangenisstraf veroordeeld, omdat ze betrokken waren bij de handel in vervalste sculpturen in de stijl van de Zwitserse kunstenaar Alberto Giacometti. De drie, twee mannen en een vrouw, hadden bekentenissen afgelegd. Hun straf is voorwaardelijk.Het proces tegen de twee hoofddaders, een kunsthandelaar uit Mainz en zijn handlanger, gaat in juni verder.

meer via yc – Celstraffen voor Giacometti-fraude.

February 3rd, 2011

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Knokke geeft kritiek op valse Congokunst toe

Guido Gryseels, directeur van het Koninklijk Museum voor Midden-Afrika in Tervuren, reageert negatief op de omstreden tentoonstelling van de ‘Congo Collectie’, waar een loopje genomen wordt met de authenticiteit.

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http://knack.rnews.be/nl/actualiteit/nieuws/cultuur/erfgoed/afrikamuseum-tervuren-bevestigt-vervalsingen-knokke/article-1194895348271.htm

Fakes and Forgeries – Afrikamuseum Tervuren bevestigt vervalsingen Knokke

December 25th, 2010

Posted In: vervalsing